Through the Looking Glass: Website Reporting Approaches

In this article I will describe some common approaches to reporting and analytics.

If you already have analytics system in place, it is time to think about reporting on your website. In this article I will describe some common approaches to reporting and analytics.

Ad-Hoc Reporting: This type of reports is done only once, usually to answer a research question or after a major update. For example, if you want to find out where the site visitors geographically come from but suspect this will not change significantly month on month. Regular reporting  can be done monthly, weekly or daily to track performance over time.

Reporting by segment summarizes information using the segments you have (see my post on segmentation). Detailed reporting examines the data at page level (this way you can find out how different pages perform and what key user journeys are). Holistic reporting  contains website data in general (for example, you want to display KPIs of the whole site). Most likely you will combine different levels of data granularity in your report.

The reports you produce will differ depending on the stakeholder group you create them for. For example, reports for senior management will demonstrate trends and bird’s eye view of data. Reports for Marketing department may contain numbers on campaign performance, click-through rates and page/product rankings.

Analytics reports can also produce different types of analysis from descriptive to casual. At the same time, the goal of reporting may include increasing conversion, analyzing user journey, leading users to certain pages, increasing time on site, decreasing bounce rates, optimizing campaign performance, understanding SEO or referral traffic, etc.

You will most likely need to decide how to benchmark or evaluate the data. One way is to compare the data to the previous reporting period (e.g. June data to May data). This, however, does not take into account seasonal or weekday fluctuations, which may have a significant impact on performance. Another way is to compare the reporting period to the same period in the past, e.g. June 2017 to June 2016. This will provision for fluctuations, however, will not consider how different the conditions could have been in the past or what overall traffic growth was realized. A third way to approach benchmarking is compare your performance to that of your industry segment or your main competitor (this data will seldom be available). And finally, if a business goal is set, the KPIs will be evaluated against this goal.

I hope this article has given you some ideas what can be included into your reporting. Apart from setting the framework, it is important to provide human and technical resources for successful reporting.

Picture source: Unsplash

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Author: Elena

I acquired a BA degree in International Business with a specialization in Marketing from Nuremberg Technical School and a parallel degree from Leeds Metropolitan University. In 2013-2014, I worked in the field of performance and conversion optimization with an IT company and then was employed in content marketing. In 2016, I went back to working with Web Analytics and gained additional experience in project management. During this time, I received an Award of Achievement in Digital Analytics from the University of British Columbia (Canada). Currently, I am employed in Online Marketing. My areas of specialization include online marketing strategy, content creation, web analytics, conversion optimization and usability.

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