Website UX/UI Testing Parameters Part II

In this post, I will discuss compatibility, performance and security testing as important parameters of UX website testing.

In the previous post, I covered the first group of website testing parameters. In this post, I will discuss compatibility, performance and security testing.

website testing

  • Check how your website is rendered through different browsers and if the website functionality is maintained. You surely do not need to cover all existing browsers, however, the website should be compatible with the essential browsers and browser versions. In case you have visitor statistics from the past, you will know which browsers your visitors use (this may differ e.g. depending on the business you are in). Otherwise, you can use available statistics, such as by W3 (https://www.w3counter.com/globalstats.php). By the way, instead of installing all of the browsers, you can just turn to one of browser testing tools (Browser Sandbox, Ghostlab, etc.)
  • Device compatibility at a higher level means mobile-friendly layout and functionality. At a more granular level, it means compatibility with most often used devices, in particular with their screen sizes and resolutions.
  • Statistics on operating systems (device platforms) can also be found in your previous web analytics reports, or, in the absence of those, on the Web (here you can also refer to W3 website).
  • The last point on compatibility refers to the most common OS, browser and device combinations. Also here you can use professional testing tools without having to buy hundreds of devices.
  • Load testing examines how a site would perform at peak loads (extremely high user activity), stress testing may stretch the site beyond its limits or well beyond an expected peak load.
  • Take preventive measures in order for a website crash not to happen  (use a reliable hosting company, cautiously make code changes)  or to restore your website quickly in case it does crash (making a backup, of course).
  • Website speed greatly influences not only user experience but also how your website is ranked in the search engines. For determining the site speed you can again turn to Google Search Console, but there are a lot of other tools out there.
  • Login security guarantees that only logged in users can view certain areas of your site, but also that each user may only use their unique user name and password.
  • Form validation means that only valid information can be entered. It is essential that your website’s code cannot be manipulated through form fields.
  • Internal website files should not be available to external viewers unless you want some of them to be accessible (such as .pdf files for download). Also, be careful about any transactions involving file uploads to prevent visitors from uploading executable files.
  • SSL enables secure file transfer between a server and a client and is an crucial feature of any up-to-date website. Using SSL causes that the links in the browser appear as https://. In case SSL is not present, website visitors will get a warning from most browsers.
  • This is by no means a full list of measures to protect your website from hack attacks, so check logs of important transactions and error messages to identify any security breach attempts. Abnormal user behavior can sometimes be identified through your web analytics data.

Using the framework shown above, you will be able to test most important UX/UI parameters of your website before or just after it goes live.tes

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