Elements of a Marketing Strategy – Part 2

This is the second part of my post on important elements of a marketing strategy In these posts, I would like to share a more general view on marketing, without getting into detail on the tools and strategy implementation.

marketing strategy
Elements of a marketing strategy

Company

One of the most important steps in creating a marketing strategy, in addition to defining the products you offer and your target customers, is defining who you are. In other words, your company identity and how you want to communicate it.

Branding

Remember that your company is a solid part of your brand. Do not neglect corporate identity elements, such as logo, colors, fonts, etc. Once they are set, use them consistently in the marketing and sales materials, as well as internal documentation.

People

This is arguably the most important company asset and should be part of your marketing strategy. This aspect, is, of course, not just limited to PR efforts for senior management. A lot of tech companies employ “product evangelists” to personalize their marketing. Apart from this, sharing personal employee stories, e.g. on social media, may contribute to the positive image of your company and create more trust.

Mission and vision statements

Although they may seem unimportant at first, a well-formulated set of values and a common vision can become a driving force for company development. They can also be the “glue” that holds different people together.

Although it may sound ironical, it is equally important to define who you are not. Trying to serve more customer segments and flexibly adapting your company image accordingly will confuse your customers. In the worst case, they will start distrusting you.

Competitors

Someone once said that companies should stop concentrating on beating the competitors and instead focus on delivering value to their customers. Although I share the same view, this doesn’t mean that you must disregard the competition.

Learning from competitors

Learning from competitors has two sides to it. On the one hand, you can benchmark the strategy of your more experienced /successful competitors. On the other hand, you can also learn from their mistakes. Take a critical look at:

  • Structure and design of their websites
  • User journey on the website
  • Selection of social media channels and shared content
  • SEO strategy (backlinks opportunities, keywords, etc.)
  • Content types used for content marketing

Direct and indirect competition

In order to understand who your competitors are, you can think in terms of competition levels (e.g. a model by Lehman & Winter).

You probably concentrate on your direct competitors (product form competition), however, try to think of competition in a wider sense. Product category competition includes similar products that can differ in functionality or design. Generic competition is the next competition level that includes products that can be used as substitutes but do not offer the same features or benefits. Budget competition comes from products allocated to the same part of consumer budget (e.g. “entertainment”, “housing”, “education”).

competition levels marketing
Marketing Competition Levels (Lehman & Winter)

Marketing tools

I put marketing tools at the end of this list on purpose. If a company lacks experience in marketing, they tend to concentrate on the tools too much. It is not uncommon that they ask such questions as: “Shall we use Google AdWords?”, “What do we write in our blog?” before they defined who they are, what products they offer and who their target customers are. (I talked about this in one of my older blog posts on mistakes in marketing).

One well-known model for marketing decisions is 4 P’s by McCarthy (Product, Place, Price, Promotion). If we adjust this model to online marketing, the promotion will include:

  • Advertising (Google AdWords, display, etc.)
  • PR (Social Media, blogs, guest articles, etc.)
  • Direct selling (e-mail marketing)
  • Promotion (e-coupons, free trial, etc.)

You also need to make decisions on how to position your product, what pricing strategy you will choose and what your sales channels will be.

All in all, when crafting your marketing strategy, you need to go through several distinct steps and plan carefully. Also, remember that once the strategy is selected, you need to follow it consistently. Making too many changes and adjustments along the way will inevitably result in time and budgetary losses.

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Welcome to the New Marketing to Convert Blog!

I have now moved to a self-hosted blog from wordpress.com and want to share my experience with moving the site. The main difficulties were:

  • Comparing hosting providers for WP blogs and identifying important features that should be included in the offer.
  • Coming up with a domain name for the blog. I had to analyze the broad spectrum of topics represented on this blog and came up with Marketing to Convert as something conveying the essence and the purpose behind the articles.
  • Finding suitable and GDPR-compatible plugins for analytics, cookies, etc.
  • Finding how to re-implement the functionality of the previous blog (e.g. the WordPress following button is now implemented through the email subscription widget).
  • Fine-tuning the theme and the layout (I stayed with the same theme as on allaroundmarketing.wordpress.com, however, this still looked different on a self-hosted blog). I chose this theme because of good color contrast and the overall sleek and stylish look, however, I am still not 100% satisfied with the font readability.
  • Setting up additional functionality, such as social sharing buttons, etc.
  • Selecting a suitable SEO-Plugin (I went with Yoast first, however, I did not like its functionality and selected Rank Math instead).
  • Updating connected Social Media accounts, including my personal accounts.

There are still some tasks that remain open, such as changing the blog logo and further exploring the additional functionality now available. I am also still thinking about how to handle the existing (old) blog and make the transition as smooth as possible (e.g. checking for backlinks, handling subscriptions, etc.). There is also a lot of SEO optimization to be done both for the articles and for the blog as a whole. However, at this point, I am satisfied with the first results and motivated to work further on improving the visibility of the new website.

 

Usability Testing: Recap Webmontag Bonn

This post is a recap of Webmontag Bonn (October 21, 2019) that was dedicated to usability testing topics. The speaker explained Think Aloud method in detail. This presentation was followed by a discussion on website usability and accessibility.

This post is a recap of Webmontag Bonn (October 21, 2019) that was dedicated to usability testing topics.

It started with a talk by the organizer, Lina D., that introduced general concepts of usability testing. Normally, it includes figuring out how intuitive a UI is, how users handle their tasks within a UI and what improvements can be possibly made. Some common methods include prototyping, benchmarking, case studies with personas, interviews, eye-tracking, etc. The speaker went into detail regarding the Think Aloud method. This method has the following parts:

  • A prototype is built (can be also done on existing software or even on a paper prototype)
  • A use case is written (i.e. a task that a user has to fulfill);
  • Users are invited for a short interview;
  • During ice-breaker, the tester tries to define what customer type the user belongs to;
  • A task is presented to the user. They have to complete the task while commenting on their actions;
  • The test completes with a short feedback round;
  • The whole test lasts about 20 minutes

The talk was followed by a lively discussion about the presented method and also about general usability problems. One question was how to select test participants, especially in the case of a very narrow target group. For example, you can try to reach them in person through industry events, etc. My suggestion was to launch the software and get feedback by analyzing analytics data or making online surveys (though from my experience a lot of people use this survey instead of customer service chat). Somebody also suggested recruiting the participants for one-on-one tests by displaying banners within the software.

There was also a lengthy discussion on accessibility. In the public sector in Germany, there exist accessibility catalogs that constitute minimum requirements for the software to be accepted. However, without proper accessibility testing, such catalogs are only partially helpful. It was noted that a lot of times users with a disability have a completely different workflow interacting with a software or a website.

The last topic that was brought up in the large discussion round was about how to onboard users to new software. For example, through instructional videos, FAQs, pop-up windows within the user interface (UI), or an overlay with explanations of different elements on the first login.

After this, the discussions of the Webmontag continued in smaller groups accompanied by pizza and cold drinks.

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