Google AdWords Series: Ad Placements You Might not Know about

Basically, there are three campaign types in Google AdWords: Search and Display Networks, Search Network only and Display network only. Even as a beginner, you will have a general idea where your ads appear in each campaign type (in the search results and/or on matching websites). However, there are some other ad placements that are not so obvious.

  • Google Instant/ Google Suggest. When someone starts typing a search phrase, Google suggests variants for this phrase, e.g. “buy flowers… ” gets suggestions for “buy flowers online”, “buy flowers near me”, etc. First case: the user selects one of the suggested phrases (“buy flowers online”) and presses Enter. Your ad will appear if you bid for “buy flowers online”.  Second case: the user types in “buy flowers” and pauses for a short while. In this case, your add will appear if you bid for “buy flowers”. Third case: the user types the search term differently, e.g. “buy flours”, which gets auto corrected, and your add will appear if you bid for “buy flowers”.
  • Google Search Network sites. These may include local search engines, such web.de, or even personal websites. (“Search powered by Google”)
  • Parked domains. These are undeveloped Web pages or domain names that are no longer hosting a Web page. Google may classify them as Search Network or a Display Network sites and thus show your ads on these parked domains.
  • Error pages (such as 404 error pages). Some of them may also show ads (instead of Display Network sites) if they are recognized as relevant by AdSense for Errors.
  • Google Sites – for Display Network. These include YouTube, Blogger, etc. sites. Remember that you can choose contextual targeting (websites on a certain topic), managed placements (certain websites) or filter by audience (e.g. people who have already visited your site).
  • In mobile apps. This is available if you had selected this option for your Display campaign. In other words, adverts can appear both in mobile browsers and in apps which are part of the Google Display Network.

It is important to know where your ads may appear, because you may want to evaluate how the ads perform in this case or even exclude some of these placements from your campaign.

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Google AdWords Series: Understanding Location Settings

As Google is strengthening the location factor in its search algorithms, location targeting remains extremely important for managing AdWords campaigns as well.

As Google is strengthening the location factor in its search algorithms, location targeting remains extremely important for managing AdWords campaigns as well.

Location targeting increases the ROI of your advertisement, by showing the ads only to the people who can be your potential customers and possibly will have a genuine interest in your product or service based on the geographical proximity.

Location targeting

You can set your target goals on the basis of

a) countries

b) areas within a country

c) radius of a location.

More advanced campaign management allows including or exclude the locations based on several additional factors:

a) enclosing locations (areas larger than your target locations)

b) related locations (e.g. having a similar name)

c) nearby locations.

Another special feature is airport targeting, that allows you to target people located in some 300 airports around the world surfing on their mobile devices while waiting for a plane.

User location identification

It is of primary importance to understand how location targeting actually functions in AdWords.

Here is a list of factors considered by Google to determine if an ad should be shown for a search term or on display network:

  • Location interest (only for the same country), this will be explained in more detail below
  • Google domain. e.g.  Google.fr or Google.de
  • IP adress
  • The location of the user in Google Profiles, if signed in
  • Google search history
  • For mobile ads, the location is additionally determined on the basis of GPS, Wi-Fi, Google’s cell ID data

By default, Google includes not just the people located in the target location, but also searching for products or services in the target location. E.g. if you are based in Berlin and look for shoe stores in Munich, ads by Munich advertisers will appear, though they might not have set Berlin as their target location.

As it has been mentioned above, this does not work between the countries, so you will not see ads by Parisian shoe stores if you are in Berlin and look for shoe stores in Paris, unless a French store specifically targets Berlin.  The only exception is if you actually get on Google.fr to conduct your search, as the domain “signals” the country you are interested in, as well as the language you want your search results to be displayed in.

However, for most campaigns advanced location options are available, which allows you to tune in your advertising by excluding either people not physically located in your target area or not searching for (search campaigns) or looking at pages about (display campaigns) your target area.

Optimizing AdWords location settings

As always in online marketing, make sure to monitor how your current location settings perform and optimize them incrementally.

The following can be done to optimize your location settings

a) find out which locations perform better than others

b) assign more budget and increase the bids for better performing locations to attract more traffic

c) write customized ads and create landing pages for your most profitable locations, and even think how you may “localize” your offer to better match the customers’ needs.

All in all, understanding how location targeting works will lead to better campaign customization and higher conversions for your ads.

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Google AdWords Series: Selecting the Keywords and Matching Options

How to select the keywords in AdWords and how Google matches them to the search queries.

Selecting the keywords for your campaign is a science for itself, but there are several common recommendations you can keep to:

  • Think in terms of a concrete problem your potential customer wants to solve, a situation where your product is used or how what features and qualities are peculiar to your product or brand. Instead of “shoes” use “white Adidas shoes” “tennis shoes” “lightweight shoes” “big size shoes”.
  • Do not select your keywords too generally, more specific keywords often signal a higher purchase possibility. Use 2-3 word combinations, possibly including a word signaling buying intention (buy XXX online). If relevant, localize your keywords (XXX in Berlin).
  • You can find good sources for relevant keyword combinations by: analyzing your own web page and marketing material; watching your competitors; performing test searches in Google/Bing; surveying your customers or your target segment; scanning industry-related news in search for trends; or even using web tools like the free Google Keyword Planner tool (this, however, is not meant to encourage  you to generate whole lists automatically!).
  • According to Google, you do not need to include forms of the same word or misspellings, but make sure to consider synonyms and modifiers commonly used with your keywords (e.g. noun+adjective phrases).
  • Consider both the frequency of the search and the competition for the keywords you select. The higher the competition is, the higher your cost per click will be. Do not use keywords that have little relevance for your products and website, otherwise this will result in low conversions and bad quality score for your keywords (more on the quality score and the actual cost per click in my next articles on Google AdWords).

After preparing lists of 10-20 keywords for each AdWord Group, decide on the type of keyword match you would like to use.

  • Broad match. This matching option helps Google make most of its money with AdWords. Any words you enter without additional marking will, per default, use the type broad match. To explain, if you type in white shoes, Google may match it with white boots, and black shoes. I would not recommend this option for anyone, and especially for beginners, unless you are bidding on your brand name or have a unique product that only you sell.
  • Broad match modifier. In this case, words of a phrase have a “plus” sign in front of them. Words in these phrases are matched to search queries in any order, but synonyms are not used. In other words, +white +shoes will match to: shoes of white color, shoes in white, a white sport shoe.
  • Phrase match. For this option you need to type in your keywords in inverted commas. The related search results will include the complete phrase you enter plus any words before or after it- “white shoes” will be matched with white shoes Adidas, second hand white shoes, etc.
  • Exact match. To use it, enter your keywords in square brackets, e.g. [white shoes], in this case only the exact search terms entered will be matched to your ad. This might significantly limit the number of impressions for your ads, but will probably result in higher CTR rates and conversions.
  • Negative match. If you use broad or phrase match, do not forget to include a list of negative keywords. In the example with white shoes, assuming you are an owner of an online shoe shop you may want to include the words “for free” or the names of well-known brands you do not carry.

Remember to use the keywords in your ad copy and if appropriate, the display URL as well. After setting up a campaign and running it for a couple of days (or several hours for large campaigns), make sure to review the performance of the separate keywords. If a keyword gets almost no impressions, it is probably too specific to be matched against search terms. If the CTR is too low, then your ad copy is not very relevant for what the visitor is looking for (especially in case of broad match options) or is simply not very well written. And finally, if the conversion on the clicked ads is low, make sure to optimize your landing page or otherwise bid on more specific keywords and add more negative keywords to make sure you get more qualified leads.

 

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