Click Here, Not There: Making Your Calls-To-Action More Effective

Calls-to-action are the most important part of landing pages. In this article, I will provide some recommendations on how to make your CTA’s work better.

A call-to-action, or a CTA, is probably one of the most important parts of a landing page. Usually designed in the form of a button, this short imperative phrase tells the user what action to take. In this article, I will provide some general recommendations on how to make your calls-to-action work better.

  • CTA text

    Avoid vague formulations, such as “Click here”, tell your visitors exactly what you want them to do:  “Sign up for the newsletter”, “Submit the registration form”.  If the phrase used for CTA seems to be very long, you can break it into two parts (e.g. Sign up now – and receive our weekly newsletter). Write the explanatory, second part either below the main CTA (in smaller letters) or put it outside the button – above or below. In the CTA text, you can either evoke the sense of urgency: “Sign up now”, “Limited offer” ; or mention the main benefit for the user: “Get free expert advice”.

  • Number of unique CTA’s

    An older rule prescribes only one unique call to action per landing page. Asking users to perform two or more actions on the same page can confuse them when navigating. However, sometimes there are two or even more options a user may have on the same landing page, depending on their stage in the buying process or their buyer type. An example would be offering to sign up for the trial or taking a feature tour first. In this case you would need two CTA buttons. They can be positioned next to each other or one on top of the other. Usually, the more important one of the two CTAs comes first and is highlighted graphically (e.g. with a brighter color).

  • CTA design

    In designing your CTA’s, you will need to balance two requirements: first, your CTA should look like an organic element of the landing page, and second, it should have enough contrast to the rest of the page to be noticed and clicked. Make your button 3-dimensional: use gradients and shadowing to get that “clickable” look. Also, an arrow within the button or outside it can have a positive influence on conversion.

  • CTA color

    It is believed that buttons with signal colors (red or orange) work better, however, do not sacrifice the look of your page in favor of a red button if does not match the overall design. You may also use some creativity and add texture or pattern to the design of your button, but only if this goes well with the look of the page and the product you are offering. Remember that in any case, the CTA text must remain clearly readable.

  • CTA positioning

    Placing the CTA button “above the fold” as the first element on the page seems like a good idea. However, visitors might not be ready to perform the desired action until they know more about what you have to offer. So I would recommend listing your main benefits first and then introducing the first CTA. A widely used strategy for longer landing pages is several CTA buttons (one above and one or two below the fold). In this case, make sure that your buttons look the same and contain the same text, otherwise it may look confusing.

  • CTA size

    Make sure that the CTA you make has large (but not disproportional) size, in order to be noticed by users “skimming” the page.  Regardless of the size, you need to leave enough white space around the CTA: this will make the button recognizable in the text flow.

The given recommendations can help you to improve the click-through rate of a CTA. However, to achieve maximum results on your particular landing page, A/B testing is recommended.

Examples of CTA buttons

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Author: Elena

I acquired a BA degree in International Business with a specialization in Marketing from Nuremberg Technical School and a parallel degree from Leeds Metropolitan University. In 2013-2014, I worked in the field of performance and conversion optimization with an IT company and then was employed in content marketing. In 2016, I went back to working with Web Analytics and gained additional experience in project management. During this time, I received an Award of Achievement in Digital Analytics from the University of British Columbia (Canada). Currently, I am employed in Online Marketing. My areas of specialization include online marketing strategy, content creation, web analytics, conversion optimization and usability.

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