Click Here, Not There: Making Your Calls-To-Action More Effective

Calls-to-action are the most important part of landing pages. In this article, I will provide some recommendations on how to make your CTA’s work better.

A call-to-action, or a CTA, is probably one of the most important parts of a landing page. Usually designed in the form of a button, this short imperative phrase tells the user what action to take. In this article, I will provide some general recommendations on how to make your calls-to-action work better.

  • CTA text

    Avoid vague formulations, such as “Click here”, tell your visitors exactly what you want them to do:  “Sign up for the newsletter”, “Submit the registration form”.  If the phrase used for CTA seems to be very long, you can break it into two parts (e.g. Sign up now – and receive our weekly newsletter). Write the explanatory, second part either below the main CTA (in smaller letters) or put it outside the button – above or below. In the CTA text, you can either evoke the sense of urgency: “Sign up now”, “Limited offer” ; or mention the main benefit for the user: “Get free expert advice”.

  • Number of unique CTA’s

    An older rule prescribes only one unique call to action per landing page. Asking users to perform two or more actions on the same page can confuse them when navigating. However, sometimes there are two or even more options a user may have on the same landing page, depending on their stage in the buying process or their buyer type. An example would be offering to sign up for the trial or taking a feature tour first. In this case you would need two CTA buttons. They can be positioned next to each other or one on top of the other. Usually, the more important one of the two CTAs comes first and is highlighted graphically (e.g. with a brighter color).

  • CTA design

    In designing your CTA’s, you will need to balance two requirements: first, your CTA should look like an organic element of the landing page, and second, it should have enough contrast to the rest of the page to be noticed and clicked. Make your button 3-dimensional: use gradients and shadowing to get that “clickable” look. Also, an arrow within the button or outside it can have a positive influence on conversion.

  • CTA color

    It is believed that buttons with signal colors (red or orange) work better, however, do not sacrifice the look of your page in favor of a red button if does not match the overall design. You may also use some creativity and add texture or pattern to the design of your button, but only if this goes well with the look of the page and the product you are offering. Remember that in any case, the CTA text must remain clearly readable.

  • CTA positioning

    Placing the CTA button “above the fold” as the first element on the page seems like a good idea. However, visitors might not be ready to perform the desired action until they know more about what you have to offer. So I would recommend listing your main benefits first and then introducing the first CTA. A widely used strategy for longer landing pages is several CTA buttons (one above and one or two below the fold). In this case, make sure that your buttons look the same and contain the same text, otherwise it may look confusing.

  • CTA size

    Make sure that the CTA you make has large (but not disproportional) size, in order to be noticed by users “skimming” the page.  Regardless of the size, you need to leave enough white space around the CTA: this will make the button recognizable in the text flow.

The given recommendations can help you to improve the click-through rate of a CTA. However, to achieve maximum results on your particular landing page, A/B testing is recommended.

Examples of CTA buttons

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How to write for the online reader

How to write online
A laptop (Source: Unsplash)

In this article I would like to talk about how people usually read online and how it will affect your writing.

  • People seldom read for pleasure on the Internet. Most of the time they look for particular information or research on a subject.

Use headlines to give a precise idea about the content you offer. Do not write headlines in obscure style, hoping that the reader will be intrigued by it. Most of the time, if users see no direct relevance to their search in the headline, they hit the “back” button.

  • People tend to scan rather than read, which means that they read less attentively. They also sometimes skip sections of text.

Use subheading as signposts to help your readers find better orientation in your content. Structure your text clearly: include one idea per paragraph and start your paragraph with this key idea. Use bulleted or numbered lists, where appropriate. Make sure to adjust the anchor text of your links: “learn more about our program” instead of “click here”.  Use images that support the main idea of your text and do not forget about captions, as well as <alt> and <title> tags.

  • Users generally prefer informal, easy-to-read texts

Write in shorter sentences and paragraphs. Use active voice instead of passive constructions. Apply personal pronouns instead of naming yourself or the user (“we” instead of “our company”, “you” instead of “the reader”).

  • Readers respect authoritative sources and look for supportive data

Do not hesitate to quote other sites in your content, as long as they have authority and credibility. Also, avoid exaggerated language and try to convince readers based on facts about your products or services. Include any important details or technical data, but place them in separate sections on your website, not on the main page. If you link to documents for download, mention the format and the size of the file.

  • Users expect up-to-date content

Set up “an expiry date” for every piece of content you produce, either in your CMS system  or in your editorial calendar. Some articles will have longer “life” than others (food recipes vs live-ticker of a football match).  Make sure to review and update the articles regularly. Also, periodically curate and improve the existing content, especially on pages with higher bounce rates. 

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Men Shop on Mars, Women Shop on Venus: Gender in E-Commerce

This post is a recap of the 20th E-Commerce Forum at Flagbit in Karlsruhe that was dedicated to the topic of gender in e-commerce.

gender in e-commerce
Source: Unsplash

The presenter, Astrid Wunsch, spoke about the gender-related differences in buying behavior that any online-shop owner needs to consider. The presentation was followed by a lively discussion and experience sharing. Summarizing the main points, the following recommendations can be given.

  • Consider who your audience is. Even though your products will mostly define who your target customers are (make-up products as a female domain, vs. men shopping for electronic goods), do not simply make assumptions without checking your customer data. For example, on the website selling vacuum cleaners, 2/3 of buyers were female. Also consider cross-buying, e.g. women buying clothing for their husbands. On a voucher aggregator platform, one of the most popular vouchers selected by men was that of a perfume shop.
  • Adjust the buying process in your shop. Men are normally result-oriented and know what kind of product they want. They prefer clear-structured shops with search and filter functions and few distractions. Women, on the contrary, like looking around and enjoy the buying experience itself. Their buying decision takes longer, as they need to consider a number of alternatives first. Women also like to be advised in the buying process,  so it is a good idea to set up a live chat or a customer hotline.
  • Think about product presentation. Male users need technical data and product details. They prefer to see the product in 3-dimensional view, isolated from context or other products. They also respond positively to product videos. Female customers pay more attention to colors and patterns of a product page. They also like to see products in real-life context, surrounded by other objects and performing their function. Women get more influenced by stories and testimonials around products, as well as positive social media signals.

In Europe, buying power of women is constantly increasing, and besides, women influence over two thirds of all buying decisions. Nevertheless, most online shops and websites in general still appeal to and made for a male audience. Maybe it is time to start thinking in the other direction?

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